ANKLE AND FOOT PAIN DESCRIPTION AND CAUSES

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Foot pain and ankle pain can make everyday life tortuous. Yet foot pain and ankle pain are common. You don’t need to live with it!

Your feet and ankles are complicated, delicate, yet strong enough to bear your weight. However, they are good candidates for injury and pain. Even a long-ago sprain may be the culprit for today’s pain, especially if there’s scar-tissue buildup.

Foot pain and ankle pain can originate in the bones, ligaments, tendons, muscles, fascia or nerves.

Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. The tissue connecting the heel to the toes becomes irritated. Heel spurs are also a common condition; one in 10 people have heel spurs. Heel spurs may be the result of overcompensating for other abnormalities in your musculoskeletal system.

Even poorly fitted shoes can be the cause of foot pain or ankle pain.

Nerve damage, sometimes from an injury, is another cause of ankle pain or foot pain. We often find that nerves originating in the lower spine can send pain triggers down the leg, to the foot and ankle. By treating the root cause, we can alleviate your pain.

Symptoms

  • Heel pain
  • Pain increases in the morning, when getting out of bed
  • Foot pain when walking or standing
  • Weakness
  • Arch pain
  • Limping
  • Difficulty pushing off with toes
  • Flattened arch
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Dull, throbbing pain
  • Sharp, shooting pain

GENERAL TREATMENT OF ANKLE AND FOOT PAIN

First, a thorough examination will determine the cause of the pain. Common treatments for foot pain and ankle pain include cold laser, ultrasound, manipulation and customized exercises and stretches.

Because pain may originate with pressure on spinal nerves, the lower leg and ankle muscles can weaken. This may change your gait, increase pain or even lead to arthritis.

An ankle sprain typically means the ligaments are stretched or torn. Even if the pain is stopped, the ligaments remain weakened and repeat injuries are common.

Release therapy targets the calf muscles and a splint or bandage may be used to stabilize the ankle joint. We need to get the bones back to their normal position to make sure future injuries don’t occur.